Xem thêm

Sephora Kids and the Dangers of Skincare Obsession

CEO Tinh Phung
Kids these days seem to be all about skincare. They're flocking to Sephora, eager to get their hands on the latest products. But dermatologists are raising concerns about this growing trend. It turns out that...

Kids these days seem to be all about skincare. They're flocking to Sephora, eager to get their hands on the latest products. But dermatologists are raising concerns about this growing trend. It turns out that these young skincare enthusiasts are using products they don't need and, in some cases, even harming their skin.

Dr. Brooke Jeffy, a dermatologist, shared a disturbing story about an 11-year-old patient who developed a severe rash from using retinol, an ingredient commonly found in anti-aging products. Despite not needing such products at such a young age, the child persisted in using them, resulting in a month-long recovery period.

This scenario is becoming all too common, with dermatologists like Dr. Jeffy urging parents and children to be cautious in their skincare choices. The beauty industry and social media play significant roles in perpetuating unnecessary fears of aging and promoting products that are unsuitable for kids.

Kids have never been more obsessed with skincare − and dermatologists say it Kids have never been more obsessed with skincare − and dermatologists say it

Why Skincare for Adults Is Not Suitable for Kids

Dr. Jeffy has witnessed children using as many as eight skincare products every morning and following elaborate routines as seen on TikTok. The main culprits causing harm to their skin are retinol, exfoliating acids, and fragrance. These ingredients can lead to irritation, allergies, and damage to the skin barrier.

When the skin barrier is compromised, it becomes dry, prone to infection, rashes, and breakouts. Furthermore, the weakened skin barrier becomes less effective in shielding against environmental damage, such as UV radiation or pollution. While dermatologists sometimes recommend retinoid products for teens with specific conditions like acne, they carefully weigh the potential downsides.

From an anti-aging perspective, retinol is unnecessary for those below the age of twenty. Collagen depletion, which is associated with aging, typically begins in one's twenties. Thus, investing in anti-aging products at a young age does not provide any significant benefits.

According to Dr. Danilo Del Campo, a dermatologist in Chicago, children only require a gentle cleanser, a light moisturizer, and sunscreen. Additional skincare products should be used only under the guidance of a board-certified dermatologist. Interestingly, Dr. Anthony Rossi in New York highlights the irony that kids seem more interested in anti-aging skincare than in applying sunscreen, which is, in fact, the most effective anti-aging measure.

TikTokers are using red light for skin; dermatologists say they’re on to something

The Influence of Social Media and More

Dr. Jeffy attributes the surge in kids' obsession with skincare to social media and the COVID-19 pandemic. Social media exposes children to constant marketing, turning skincare and certain brands into status symbols. Moreover, the shift to virtual interactions during the pandemic, with increased screen time, has made kids more conscious of their appearance on platforms like Zoom.

When asked about their motivation for using these products, many young patients mention the aesthetics of skincare products on their shelves or vanities. It's clear that children are easily swayed by what they see on social media and the allure of stylish packaging.

What is a 'Hannibal Lecter facial'? Why people are sending electricity into their faces

Skincare Shouldn't Be a Source of Stress for Kids

Dermatologists and parents are not the only ones concerned about the beauty industry's hold on young children. Videos of girls flooding Sephora stores and spending exorbitant amounts on skincare products have gone viral – raising eyebrows and eyebrows.

Dr. Del Campo emphasizes that kids already have enough to worry about, with school, family, friends, and sleep. Skincare should be a foundation of healthy behavior, not an additional stressor in their lives.

Got retinol questions? We've got answers

It's essential for parents to guide their children towards age-appropriate skincare habits and educate them about the potential risks and benefits. Seeking advice from board-certified dermatologists before introducing additional products is crucial. Let's prioritize the well-being of our kids and help them embrace healthy behaviors without unnecessary stress about their skincare routines.

1